Tag Archives: Prodigy

LEGEND Trilogy: Nicole’s Review

Legend TrilogyTitle: LEGEND, PRODIGY, CHAMPION

Author: Marie Lu

Publisher: Speak (Penguin Group)

Genre: YA Fantasy

Release Date: Various

Pages: Various

Synopsis: Since this review covers all three books in the trilogy, I’ll stick with high level plot recaps for books 2 and 3:

LEGEND: What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths – until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’s death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

PRODIGY: June and Day join the Patriot rebels to win help and passage to the Colonies just as a new Elector Primo ascends. The only catch is they have to assassinate the new Elector. And what if they’re wrong?

CHAMPION: June and Day have sacrificed so much for the people of the Republic—and each other—and now their country is on the brink of a new existence. But just when a peace treaty is imminent, a plague outbreak causes panic in the Colonies, and war threatens the Republic’s border cities once more.

Review:

Okay, I admit it, Marie Lu’s LEGEND series was one I put off reading because I was burned out on dystopian and thought it was overhyped. Newsflash: It pleasantly turns several dystopian tropes on their heads and deserves all the hype it got.

The trilogy is written in first person, dual POV, but unlike some alternating YA, readers can instantly tell which character is narrating by their personality and voice. June’s logic and military training shine through, and her chapters often include a report of time and place, and fact checking reconnaissance throughout. Day, on the other hand, is far more informal and emotional. Each is equally endearing and refreshing, and Marie Lu deserves applause for pulling it off. (Sidenote: June and Day each have their own chapter font and color. Cannot explain how much I loved this! Kudos to the publisher for investing in these books at that level!)

As main characters, June and Day balance each other nicely and neither veers into an all-consuming love fest where the other person is THE ONLY THING that matters. June is worried about her brother’s memory, her old contacts and friends, and the Republic at its highest levels of structure and government. Day, meanwhile, is focused on protecting his little brother, Eden, his best friend, Tess, and in somehow getting them all out of this mess, Republic-be-damned.

The plot succeeds in large part because the characters’ values so often conflict that “love” and “helping the other” becomes a choice both Day and June must make over and over and over again. It’s never easy, and sometimes it’s not even clear that it’s right. I really enjoyed seeing a YA that drew upon these sacrifices and decisions. It made me root for June and Day’s love all the more!

The trilogy unfolds in an impressive plot arc. I’d rank LEGEND and the first half of PRODIGY as superb YA dystopian, yet Lu then takes it into whole new territory for the end of PRODIGY and CHAMPION. More adult-like in themes and complexities. Readers are kept guessing as to whether the MCs will survive or be able to be together. That’s a rarity for me, and it was delightful to sit back and wonder how CHAMPION would end. I loved how Lu pushed this!

One key plot thread emerges at the end of PRODIGY, and it literally stole my breath because I couldn’t believe the author would go there. But she didn’t shirk from it as too many YAs tend to do, and carried it through all the way. It speaks strongly of the series that my favorite of the three is CHAMPION – each gets increasingly better!

Lu also weaves in fantastic worldbuilding that feels particularly genuine and scary because you can see shades of a future that COULD happen: a country divided (Civil War, anyone?), the themes of dictatorship and corporate state, the issues of right and wrong, the question of human rights overall, what constitutes freedom, and what will you fight for?

In the end, Lu’s answer, as well as June’s and Day’s, is family and people. It’s this belief that gives such a strong personal focal point to what could otherwise have felt like a political war between two distant and corrupt states. Lu mixes the personal and worldwide stakes with exceptional talent.

There are many gray answers in this world, but I like that it didn’t become an excuse to view everything as gray—the trilogy definitely sets up clear right and wrong. And then it enjoys making its characters toe that line!

If the series has a fault, it’s that 15 year olds would not have been put in charge of half the stuff June and Day were. This made me chuckle in a few places, but strangely it’s also part of what made LEGEND great because the series easily reads with the subtle complexities and emotional nuances of an adult book, simply with younger MCs. If you can handle the extended suspension of disbelief, it’s well worth your time!

While LEGEND has the pacing and action of a typical dystopian, it has a twistier plot and a LOT more heart. I felt for these characters – Day in particular – and they became “real” in a way not many others do. Can’t wait for the planned movie!! Crossing my fingers for 2016!

5 Stars

5star

-Nicole

Find this trilogy on Amazon.